Articles Tagged with social media

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Venn Crawford, non-attorney Marketing Assistant

Looking for a new way to organize or connect? Here are some of the best apps for families.

Apps for Organization

Stridepost – This family managing app features chore lists, allowance trackers, and a family calendar, all of which sync across devices so that the whole family’s on the same page. Parents can add tasks to a child’s to-do list, which the child then receives points for completing. At the end of the week, kids get their “payday” and collect the points, which are redeemable for rewards. Both parents and kids can add rewards. Both kids and parents can add events to the shared family calendar, and family members can keep each other updated using the built-in family chat. (For parents: iOS, Android; for kids: iOS, Android)

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Dear Carolyn,

My ex is all over Facebook about what she did with the kids during Spring Break. She apparently took some young woman with her to babysit so she could spend more time with her boyfriend on the Florida beach. She posted my little boy “buck naked” on the beach on Facebook. She posted her “babysitter—young woman” drinking beer with at least a dozen empty beer cans in the background. She posted a picture of her boyfriend and her entwined on the beach on a blanket. And to top it all off, she posted a picture of her new engagement ring from him, and we are not even divorced. I have filed for custody of the two children. She wants alimony. Are the pictures I downloaded from Facebook admissible? Can I make her remove the nude picture of my son as I am worried about perverts? Do these Facebook pictures help me in my quest for custody and no spousal support? I am frustrated with the whole process.

Dear Frustrated,

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Dear Readers,

Internet addiction is here and is real! I would like to hear from you on this topic. Do you know that a Kaiser Family Foundation study showed that two-thirds of parents have no rules on internet use, particularly internet use unrelated to homework and research? Today’s second Ask Carolyn continues a discussion of this topic.

Dear Carolyn,

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Venn Crawford, non-attorney Marketing Assistant

Divorce and its aftermath can be (and usually are) chaotic. Having kids and keeping track of all their things was tough enough, and now you have to coordinate your parenting with someone you may not even want to talk to, much less strategize with. And on top of it all, you have to manage everything on your own. Talk about a trial by fire.

Luckily for you, there’s an app for that. Or several. These apps can’t do it all for you, but they can make things easier.

SquareHub (Free)

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Jessica Bullock, J.D.

Whether you are a working parent or stay-at-home mom or dad, each role comes with a huge set of responsibilities. Being a family lawyer, I can only offer one perspective centered around achieving that work/family balance everyone always talks about. I’m not sure the perfect balance exists and have quickly learned that for me, it’s more of a day by day approach, kind of like March Madness – survive and advance. Below are some of the things I’ve learned along the way.

Be present. Whether you’re at work or at home, maximize your time at each by being present in the moment. When you’re at the office, try not to think of the disaster that is your house. When you’re at home, focus on enjoying family time and do your best to leave work at work.

There’s no place for guilt. Feeling guilty for missing time with your kids or feeling guilty for not being able to work late does nothing but cause more stress. There are so many things in life that cause us worry; this should not be one of them. Trust in yourself! It doesn’t matter if you work or stay home, your children look to you as their role model. They watch every move you make and listen to every word you say. Do not feel guilty for the role you have chosen as both provide your children with positive learning experiences!

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Venn Crawford, non-attorney Marketing Assistant

Tip #16 – Take yourself on a date and learn to love your own company.Divorce Recovery Tip 16

Dates are a way of spending quality time with the person you love, which reinforces your bond with that person. When we go on a date with someone, we learn new things about them, create shared memories, and cultivate our love for one another. Why shouldn’t we do the same with ourselves?

Going on a date with yourself is a solitary activity – it gives you time to be who you are on your own, to pursue your interests, and to get back in touch with your innermost thoughts and desires. You might be picturing yourself alone at a candlelit table, but it doesn’t need to be anything that cheesy. Try going to an art museum, taking a scenic hike, or watching the sunset. Any activity is fine, so long as it leaves room for contemplation – put your phone away just like you would on any other date!

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In 2017, communities exist both in the physical and virtual world. Whether you call a metropolis like Greensboro, or a small town such as Asheboro, home, there exist reasonable limits to the extent you will interact with certain individuals, the peer groups you will associate with, and how information will be transmitted. In the virtual world, those limitations are effectively eliminated and with that, an increased risk when it comes to revealing what would otherwise remain personal information. It is important for clients to understand the dangers that exist in regards to their cases when maintaining an active social media presence.

A divorce is probably one of the most difficult and emotional experiences may experience. There will be times when emotions may get the best of an individual, and there seems to be no way to express yourself and attain the peace that you seek, and often individuals may resort to releasing their emotions over social media. Whatever the reason, using this medium to obtain peace of mind during this time can be very damaging to your case and reduce your chance of success at the conclusion of the process. A common theme amongst social media outbursts results in revealing too much information.

Revealing information may be intentional or unintentional, which is why it is very important to make sure you are consciously thinking about how the information you release is perceived by not only a casual bystander but by your estranged spouse and their legal counsel. People are attracted to drama, and if you are the source, then it can lead to more eyes beholding what you have released which lead to a wider dissemination of this information. Additionally, what you may think is harmless may be easily manipulated by a trained professional to paint a picture you never intended to portray. A great way to avoid this risk is to limit the amount of information you put out there; controlling the narrative is an essential part of any legal proceeding, especially in divorce.

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By Tina Ray, Legal Assistant, Woodruff Family Law GroupTina

“Mom, can I have the iPad?” “Dad, can I play on your phone?”  How many times a day do you hear that?  If you have kids, you’ve probably heard those exact words.  My grandson loves to come home with me.  Why? To play games on my phone. As you can imagine, I really feel loved.  Don’t get me wrong, when you’re having a conversation with someone, or driving, it can be very helpful to have the cell phone or iPad babysitter.  But, sometimes parents and grandparents let it go too far.

Kids are kids. They are people that need exposure to….get this…. Nature.  Fresh Air. Other kids!  Some children would play on phones and iPads all day long and not come up for air unless the battery died.  They do learn some things from these games, but not everything they need to know.  Interaction with other humans is VERY important to their mental and physical growth.

Whether you use a Droid or Apple based product, there are many categories of games available for download. Just a few are; Family Games, Puzzles, Racing, Adventure, Action and Sports Games.  These games will often show you a rating and a description to allow you to decide if this is appropriate for your child.  However, once kids begin playing, sometimes these games will prompt for an upgrade or payment to continue playing or add a new gun or car to enhance play.  You will need to make sure that your phone or iPad is set not to allow any type of payment without your input.  Of course, your kid may get a little upset about this, but they will move past it as kids do.

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CarolynMy husband Dwight prides himself on liking sappy Christmas movies, and he rents a lot of them. Ho-hum, I thought, but I was pleasantly surprised by the many social messages in Paper Angel.  The movie starts with Mom (Lynn Brandt) moving far away from Dad with her two children—Sara and Thomas. Sara is younger than Thomas. While the movie doesn’t illustrate domestic violence, Mom has a black eye, and you know what happened.  Dad loves nothing but his beer and his sports on television, and while Dad is oblivious to everyone and everything that his narcissistic soul in not entrenched in, Mom quietly gets the two children in the car and escapes with them without any of their belongings.  Mom was right to leave.

Mom, Thomas, and Sara take up residence in the “No Name City”, where life is meager and hard. Mom worked at a diner, and her boss was not very thoughtful.  The living digs were adequate, and the basketball goal in the driveway was makeshift from a bucket.  Thomas practiced basketball a lot, and he was quite good, which starts the bullying by the high school “King” of basketball.  I wonder if most bullies are afraid of something because the bully seemed afraid of losing his position as the star basketball player, and the prettiest girl in the high school just ignored him.

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Dear Carolyn,

My ex is posting all kinds of things about me on Facebook. She calls me names like bastard, devil, asshole, and you name it. She doesn’t even have privacy settings on her Facebook, so I fear that my (our) children who are ages 13 and 15 may somehow get access. She also said: “I hope to run my ex over with my car next time he comes for the children,” which I take as a threat. Can I stop this? I am filing a case for custody.

 

Carolyn Answers:

Facebook, Twitter, Snap chat and other social media have many, many great aspects. I personally use Facebook, BUT I would NEVER say anything negative about anyone on Facebook or any other social media. I would not say anything I would ever need to erase.  Facebook and social media negativity is the ruin of relationships and lawsuits.

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