Articles Posted in Children

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There are lots of fun activities for families to enjoy in and around Greensboro and Western NC this summer, and it’s especially important for divorced moms to get out there and make some wonderful new memories with their children. Divorce is hard on everyone, but middle schoolers are particularly sensitive. To help ease the pain and strengthen your family bonds, try these ideas on for size.

Greensboro Science Center – If you’re worried your kids’ brains are turning to mush from video games, hop over to the Greensboro Science Center to get them off the sofa and thinking about the way nature works. The zoo and aquarium are packed creatures both cute and creepy, and your middle schoolers will be learning in spite of themselves. And since nobody outgrows their fascination with dinosaurs, be sure to check out the Prehistoric Petting Zoo exhibit.

Old Salem Museums and Gardens – Winston-Salem is home to one of the country’s premiere living history museums, and it’s tailor-made to spark middle schoolers’ imaginations. Pop in and out of buildings at Old Salem to learn about how early settlers made medicine, taught school, and built furniture. Be sure to go on a Saturday to try your hand at old-fashioned baking techniques at the Winkler Bakery, where you’ll help make delicious Moravian cookies and bread. Continue reading →

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Divorce is difficult for families, so it’s especially important for dads and teens to enjoy time together to rebuild their bonds. One of the best ways to do this is by taking advantage of some local activities in North Carolina this summer. Whether you’re looking for a way to spice up your weekend visitations or want a mid-week escape from the ordinary, these five activities are sure to please even the pickiest teens.

Wet ’N Wild Emerald Pointe – Gone are the days when your kids were too little to go on all the rides, so let them cool off on any one of 36 slides at Wet ’N Wild, Greensboro’s own water park. Dare each other to try the 76-foot Daredevil Drop, or challenge your kids to speed to the bottom of the Riptide Racer. If you’re not interested in thrills, there’s a lazy river and plenty of lounge chairs when you need a breather.

The Winston-Salem Dash – Is there anything quite like watching the boys of summer play ball on a balmy evening? BB&T Park in downtown Winston is clean, comfortable, and plenty of fun for teens. Sports fans will love watching tomorrow’s stars show their stuff, but even kids who aren’t that into baseball will enjoy the entertainment between innings. For teens, get tickets for Fireworks Fridays or Live Music Saturdays.

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Divorced moms in Greensboro, North Carolina, know that most teens seem to have no problem spending their days inside on their phone, chatting with their friends and watching videos or streaming shows. But it’s summertime, and the great outdoors is calling. How can you entice them to put the phone on “Do Not Disturb” and join you for some fun? Here are some activities to do with your teenager in and around Greensboro.

Go to Elsewhere – If you haven’t been to Elsewhere, now’s definitely the time to go. This three-story museum housed in a former thrift store can only be described as quirky, and it’s certainly full of SnapChat photos for your teen to send to their friends. Elsewhere is also an artistic collaborative space, with events open to the public. It’s open from Friday through Sunday and admission is $5 per person.

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During and after a divorce, divorced fathers need to be vigilant in helping their children deal with the stress, insecurity, and bewilderment they are likely to feel. This is especially true for middle schoolers who are still susceptible to feeling a wide range of emotions about the divorce, simply because they may not truly understand all the circumstances. Divorced fathers who take the time to engage in a variety of quality activities with their middle schoolers will certainly make a tremendous positive impact and improve the chances of maintaining a healthy, positive relationship.

The State of North Carolina is a treasure trove of fun activities for all ages, and middle schoolers and their divorced fathers will find many things to do right in Greensboro and the surrounding areas of Guilford County.  In the summer in and around the Triad, there’s plenty of things to do both inside and outside. North Carolina is full of amazing parks and lakes, and many of them offer a multitude of activities that divorced fathers and their middle school children can enjoy. Some of the more popular parks in Guilford County include Gibson Park, Northeast Park, Southwest Park, Hagan-Stone Park…and many others.

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By Carolyn Woodruff, JD, CPA, CVA and North Carolina Family Law Specialist

The low conflict divorce might utilize a Bird’s Nest for Child Custody in Greensboro, North Carolina. It is particularly useful if that house won’t sell so no one has money for moving.

Dear Carolyn,

I just read about something that might work in my upcoming separation and divorce. I have two children who are ages eight and ten. We have to sell the marital residence for my husband and me to each buy separate residences. Therefore, we have to live together, I suppose, which is frustrating until we can sell the residence. The residence has been on the market and that we aren’t having a lot of lookers. I just heard about a “bird’s nest.” I am wondering what this is and would it work for us. My husband and I both have parents that live nearby with bedrooms each of us could use until our house sells. Can you explain this further?

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 By Carolyn Woodruff, North Carolina Family Law Specialist, JD, CPA, CVA

In North Carolina, should your parenting agreement contain a provision regarding spanking? A hot topic, and sometimes explosive in a “spare the rod, and spoil the child” mentality. So what does the research say?

Finally, we may have the definitive answer regarding spanking. A new research study looks at the negative effects, both short-term and long-term of spanking children. The study can be found in the December 2018 issue of the magazine Pediatrics. The American Academy of Pediatrics now takes the position that spanking as a form of discipline is “not only completely counter-productive, it may be potentially damaging.” The study “found that spanking fails to improve negative behavior in young children. Instead, it leads to increased aggression in the long run. Corporal punishment may also affect normal brain development by elevating stress hormones.”

Spanking in North Carolina is legal, provided that the spanking does not leave any mark on the child.

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by Tina Ray, Legal Assistant

Children aren’t children for long.  Tiny humans grow into little people with their own personalities and then into young adults with their own opinions and voice.  My daughter is 17 years old and a senior in high school.  I’ve watched her develop from a mini-me to a mature, independent young woman.  Earlier in her education, I would have to continuously ask her about her homework deadlines, school projects, and follow-up to make sure they were completed on time.  But, about two years ago, as a sophomore, she decided that it was time to buckle down and she didn’t need me to do that anymore.  College was looming in her future, and her GPA was important to her.  Her dad and I weren’t consulted about the classes that she needed to register for, and we did not need to know what type of homework or projects she had or when they were due.  McKenzie had matured overnight into a young adult.  I had my doubts, but she has managed to handle her classes and grades all by herself and maintain at least a 3.75 unweighted GPA with Honors and AP classes.   She decided that she wants to go to UNC-Greensboro to study nursing and will start in the fall.

Sports also used to be a big deal.  McKenzie excelled in soccer and softball but discovered travel volleyball at age 11, and our family embarked on a new adventure.  After playing for five years on a great team and traveling to many states to play indoor and sand volleyball, she decided she didn’t love it anymore.  Once again, she began looking forward and decided that she needed to focus on her future and concentrate on school and felt like volleyball would take too much of her time.  She was not interested in playing in college and felt that it was time to move on.  She started working part-time and thus began a new phase.

I write all of this because I want parents to know that kids grow up fast.  We blinked, and McKenzie has become her own person with her own hopes and dreams.  She doesn’t need us as much anymore.  I can remember feeling that overwhelming feeling of having young children, trying to work and maintain a home.  I would never “catch up” with everything that needed to be done.  Now, my youngest is almost grown and will be on her own soon enough.  She doesn’t need ME as much anymore.  Now, we’re more like friends sometimes than mother and daughter.

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Can the court terminate a parent’s rights for willful abandonment of the children? Are there steps a parent estranged from his child can take to ensure this doesn’t happen? In a recent North Carolina appellate decision, the court considered willful abandonment and termination of parental rights. The case arose when the parents of two minor kids separated in 2010 just before the second child was born. The mother sued for custody, child support, and alimony. The father didn’t go to the custody proceedings, and the mother was given sole custody of the kids with reasonable visitation for the father who lived in a different state.

 

Several years after that, the mother sued to terminate the father’s parental rights based on abandonment. The lower court had a hearing and decided to terminate the father’s parental rights. It waited almost a year to enter its written order. However, the father appealed the written order.

 

On appeal, the father argued: (1) the lower court hadn’t entered the written order in a timely way, (2) there wasn’t enough evidence to show abandonment, and (3) termination of his parental rights wasn’t in the kids’ best interests.

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Can a lower court restrict your use of your passport in a North Carolina child custody order? In a recent North Carolina case, the defendant appealed from the court’s denial of his motion for reconsideration and relief from a 2015 child custody and support order. The defendant was a Poland-born American citizen. He and his wife had one minor child. They separated in 2013 and were divorced in a 2014 judgment.

The plaintiff filed a complaint asking for custody of their child, child support, alimony, post-separation support, equitable distribution and attorneys’ fees. After a hearing, the lower court awarded primary physical custody to the mother, with the parents getting joint legal custody. The lower court also established a visitation order and child support obligations. The lower court included a provision stating that the father couldn’t seek or be allowed to have a passport for the couple’s minor child.

The order gave the mother sole authority and decision-making with regard to any passport applications and in case a passport was issued to or for a child, the mother would have exclusive authority not only over the passport but any foreign travel. The father was not allowed to take the minor child out of the continental United States, except where the court provided written authority to do so. His passport had to be surrendered to the clerk and he had to apply to the court if he needed to travel with his passport.

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In North Carolina, custody can be modified when there is a substantial change of circumstances, but importantly, this change need not be adverse. A positive change can also be the basis for a modification of North Carolina child custody. In a recent appellate decision, the court considered modification of custody in a child’s best interest at a grandparent’s request. The case arose from the modification of a 2012 custody order. The plaintiffs were the paternal grandparents of two children, and the plaintiff’s son was the children’s father. The children’s mother had gotten married since an earlier order of the court and her interests were opposed to the father and grandparents’ interests.

An earlier custody order had given the father sole legal and physical custody of the children. The mother had visitation rights. The father and children lived with the grandparents at that time. The father had limited intelligence and education and needed to rely on his parents. However, the mother admitted to the father that she used drugs and alcohol excessively at one point, and that she was hanging out with a man who was later imprisoned for meth sales. She wasn’t able to keep a job and had to move multiple times due to an inability to pay rent and utilities.

When the kids were five and two, their grandmother found the house covered in trash and alcohol and one of the kids had cut herself due to glass being on the floor. She removed the child from the mother’s home.