Articles Tagged with child custody

Published on:

Custody decisions are largely based on the best interests of the children. This may sound like a simple decision-making process, but the variables involved are complex. Courts must consider the child’s physical and mental health, physical safety, and developmental needs. Moral standards are also relevant when deciding custody.

It is well-known that parental conflict can significantly impact a child’s mental health, as well as their physical safety in some scenarios, but how does such conflict impact changes to child custody in North Carolina? Continue reading →

Published on:

There have been many cases in North Carolina that establish the strength and importance of a parent’s constitutionally protected right to the care and control of their children. Another recent decision in the North Carolina Court of Appeals has further established this right for biological parents, showing that it is not easy for nonparents to be awarded custody.

Continue reading →

Published on:

Parents have a constitutionally protected right to take care of their children, which includes making decisions about whom their children will spend time with. It is difficult to overcome this parental presumption. Grandparents who wish to seek visitation with their grandchildren should be aware that there are strict rules in North Carolina about when they can file and on what factors a decision will be based.

Evans v. Myers

In a recent North Carolina Court of Appeals case, Evans v. Myers, Mother appealed after the trial court granted Paternal Grandparents legal and physical custody of her child while only awarding her limited visitation.

Published on:

There must be a substantial change of circumstances in order to request a modification to a child custody order in North Carolina. Additionally, that change must affect the child or children’s welfare. Conflict between parents certainly does impact a child, but does it satisfy this requirement if this conflict has existed between the parents for a while? Continue reading →

Published on:

Modifying court-ordered custody arrangements in North Carolina requires a substantial change in circumstances and an impact on the child caused by those circumstances. What evidence must parents or guardians provide when showing a change has occurred? It depends completely on the specifics of each case, but one requirement is that the evidence must not be based on anything of which the court is already aware. Continue reading →

Published on:

North Carolina and almost every other state uses the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA) to determine jurisdiction. The UCCJEA uses four elements to determine jurisdiction in initial custody cases:

  • Home state
  • Significant connection
Published on:

Grandparents are inarguably a vital part of a child’s life, but the decision to include them is ultimately up to the parents. It can be devastating for grandparents when contact with their grandchild has been restricted. What are your options as a grandparent for seeking court-ordered visitation in North Carolina?

When Can You File for Visitation as a Grandparent?

North Carolina allows grandparents to file for visitation only in certain circumstances. The state allows grandparents to file for visitation only if the child’s family is not intact, which may include the following scenarios:

Published on:

Parents in North Carolina can request that the court modify a custody order, but changing custody and visitation arrangements will only be possible in certain situations. Continue reading →

Published on:

North Carolina statute allows anyone who claims to have a right to custody of a child to initiate a custody proceeding. Grandparents have a broad privilege to file a custody action, but how likely are they to be successful?

Continue reading →

Published on:

It is common practice for parties in a case to exchange evidence and information. This process is called discovery. There are strict rules and requirements for discovery, and failing to comply with requests from the opposing party may adversely affect your case.

Continue reading →