Articles Tagged with child custody

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It is always tragic when a child loses a parent, but what happens when the parent who passes away is the custodial parent? North Carolina courts must grant custody to someone else, and priority is given to biological parents in most cases.

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North Carolina allows divorcing parents to agree on their own terms for child support payments, but more often parents rely on the court to make a determination. Continue reading →

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Child custody orders are court-issued documents that require parents to adhere to a set of provisions regarding custody and visitation. For many parents, understanding the legal terminology included in these orders can be challenging, especially when the provisions are vague or open to more than one interpretation. Ideally, court orders would be written simply and clearly, but that is not always the case. Continue reading →

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When a North Carolina court enters a child custody order, each parent is required to follow the terms of the order. Most parents understand that violating the basic custody and visitation requirements could get them into trouble.

For example, there may be serious consequences if one parent refuses to return the child at the end of their visitation. This is a rare situation, though, and it is often the provisions that are considered less important that parents ignore or forget about. Continue reading →

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The Florida House Civil Justice Subcommittee has approved legislation, known as HB 538 or “Cassie’s Law,” which mandates the establishment of safe exchange locations for child custody transitions. The bipartisan bill aims to enhance the safety of child custody exchanges following the tragic case of Cassie Carli, a mother who disappeared and was later found dead after a custody exchange in 2022.

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Jackson v. Jackson, 2021-NCCOA-614 (2021)

  1. Facts: Mother and Father had an unincorporated child support agreement for their three children. Custody was shared between the parties. Later, one child aged out. Mother then relocated, and one child moved with her. The other remaining minor child moved in with Father. For this period, Father sought temporary child support and termination of his previous child support obligation because of the change in custody situation. Mother then filed a breach of contract for Father’s lowering and subsequent cessation of child support payments. At trial the court considered Father’s bonuses and commissions as part of his income. His base salary was $58,000, but he testified that he expected to get commissions even though he had not yet received any. The court found that father’s income was $71,000 annually.

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The Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA) is used to determine which state should have jurisdiction in interstate custody cases. It is a uniform law, which means it was written with the intention and hope that each state would adopt it and create uniformity across the country. Continue reading →

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Child custody orders in North Carolina are binding, and both parents must abide by the terms to avoid facing legal consequences. Despite this, it is possible to modify an order if there has been a change in the circumstances of either party and if the modification is in the best interest of the child. How does a judge weigh these two considerations, and does one factor need to be proven before the other? Continue reading →

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Deciding to relocate with children is not always easy, as numerous factors must be considered. Divorced, separated, or unmarried parents with custody orders have additional considerations they must think about both before and after they move. Continue reading →

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Divorce can be a challenging time, especially when children are involved. One of the most complex aspects of ending a marriage is determining custody and visitation rights. The case of Davidson v. Tuttle, 2022-NCCOA-622 offers a window into the intricate nature of these decisions and how they can change over time. Continue reading →