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Articles Posted in Custody

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There are lots of fun activities for families to enjoy in and around Greensboro and Western NC this summer, and it’s especially important for divorced moms to get out there and make some wonderful new memories with their children. Divorce is hard on everyone, but middle schoolers are particularly sensitive. To help ease the pain and strengthen your family bonds, try these ideas on for size. Continue reading →

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Divorced moms in Greensboro, North Carolina, know that most teens seem to have no problem spending their days inside on their phone, chatting with their friends and watching videos or streaming shows. But it’s summertime, and the great outdoors is calling. How can you entice them to put the phone on “Do Not Disturb” and join you for some fun? Here are some activities to do with your teenager in and around Greensboro. Continue reading →

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During and after a divorce, divorced fathers need to be vigilant in helping their children deal with the stress, insecurity, and bewilderment they are likely to feel. This is especially true for middle schoolers who are still susceptible to feeling a wide range of emotions about the divorce, simply because they may not truly understand all the circumstances. Divorced fathers who take the time to engage in a variety of quality activities with their middle schoolers will certainly make a tremendous positive impact and improve the chances of maintaining a healthy, positive relationship. Continue reading →

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By Carolyn Woodruff, JD, CPA, CVA and North Carolina Family Law Specialist

The low conflict divorce might utilize a Bird’s Nest for Child Custody in Greensboro, North Carolina. It is particularly useful if that house won’t sell so no one has money for moving. Continue reading →

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Can the court terminate a parent’s rights for willful abandonment of the children? Are there steps a parent estranged from his child can take to ensure this doesn’t happen? In a recent North Carolina appellate decision, the court considered willful abandonment and termination of parental rights. The case arose when the parents of two minor kids separated in 2010 just before the second child was born. The mother sued for custody, child support, and alimony. The father didn’t go to the custody proceedings, and the mother was given sole custody of the kids with reasonable visitation for the father who lived in a different state.

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Can a lower court restrict your use of your passport in a North Carolina child custody order? In a recent North Carolina case, the defendant appealed from the court’s denial of his motion for reconsideration and relief from a 2015 child custody and support order. The defendant was a Poland-born American citizen. He and his wife had one minor child. They separated in 2013 and were divorced in a 2014 judgment. Continue reading →

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In North Carolina, custody can be modified when there is a substantial change of circumstances, but importantly, this change need not be adverse. A positive change can also be the basis for a modification of North Carolina child custody. In a recent appellate decision, the court considered modification of custody in a child’s best interest at a grandparent’s request. The case arose from the modification of a 2012 custody order. The plaintiffs were the paternal grandparents of two children, and the plaintiff’s son was the children’s father. The children’s mother had gotten married since an earlier order of the court and her interests were opposed to the father and grandparents’ interests. Continue reading →

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Sometimes parents disagree as to the best course of treatment for a child’s mental health or health condition, or with regard to education. These issues came up in a recent North Carolina child custody appellate decision, in which a father appealed the court’s order giving a mother primary physical custody of their child, while only giving him secondary physical custody. The court had given the parents joint legal custody but gave the mother final decision making powers with regard to education and healthcare while the father retained final decision making powers with regard to sports. Continue reading →

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In a recent appellate court decision that discusses an aspect of North Carolina custody law, a mother appealed from an order that granted her and the father joint custody of teenage children pending the start of a reunification program. The program was supposed to fix the kids’ relationship to their father, which the court determined was damaged by the mother’s alienating conduct. Continue reading →