Articles Posted in Uncategorized

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Spring in Greensboro brings certain things. Pollen, unexpected rain showers, warmer weather, and taxes. The American Rescue Plan was enacted as part of ongoing Covid-19 relief. This plan provides an additional relief check, subject to income-cap requirements based on either 2019 or 2020 tax returns (most recent filed). The Plan also provides for an advance on half of a potential child tax credit for next year. These payments may both be at issue in a divorce case. Having tax return money in contention between divorcing spouses is hardly a novel concept. But due to the legislation providing pandemic relief, many spouses must find creative ways to divide relief funds when they were based on joint filings. The child credit advance presents a new wrinkle in divorce and custody cases. Continue reading →

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You have probably heard the recent story of the theft of Lady Gaga’s French bulldogs and the shooting of her dog walker. If you have not, on February 24, 2021, around 9:40 p.m., Lady Gaga’s dog walker, Ryan Fischer, was accosted and shot, and two of her three French bulldogs were stolen. A local home security camera recorded the altercation. Lady Gaga offered a $500,000 no-questions-asked reward for the safe return of her dogs. Continue reading →

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By: John Davis, NCCP

It would be a challenge to identify a person in American history with more strength of character than Harriet Tubman. She was born into slavery, enduring its horrors and privations, and escaped to lead dozens of other enslaved persons to their freedom. She lived most of her life with a bounty on her head yet openly fought for justice against entrenched power. She was a fearless conductor on the Underground Railroad, saying she “never lost a passenger”; she assisted John Brown in his fight to end slavery; she fought with the Union Army in the Civil War and even led an armed assault in South Carolina that rescued hundreds of slaves. And she lived long enough to become a suffragist fighting for women’s right to vote. Continue reading →

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North Carolina’s First Female Judge and First Female NC Supreme Court Chief Justice

Susie Marshall Sharp was born in 1907 in Rocky Mount. Her family relocated to Reidsville, where her father became a lawyer. She attended Reidsville High School, followed by the North Carolina College for Women, now known as UNC-Greensboro, and ultimately entered law school in 1926 at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Before Justice Sharp’s enrollment, only three women had graduated UNC School of Law since 1911. Continue reading →

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Covid-19 and its accompanying social distancing have been hard on everyone’s dating life. Restaurants have decreased capacity, and some are not accepting in-house dining at all. Bars close early. And masks, while necessary for health, make it hard to read how your date is going. A lot of people are likely foregoing a dinner date in public in observance of social distancing rules. With Valentine’s Day rapidly approaching, the Parks and Recreation Department in Greensboro, North Carolina has decided to offer up a take-home kit for a truly wonderful Valentine’s date. Continue reading →

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On Saturday, January 30, 2021, the International Civil Rights Center and Museum (ICRCM) hosted its 61st Anniversary Gala virtually to celebrate national and local activists who have made significant contributions to advancing human and civil rights. Despite the pandemic, ICRCM flawlessly executed the event via Zoom, where all viewers and attendees had the best seat in the house—right from their living room couches.  Continue reading →

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School starts soon, and parents in the Piedmont Triad area are understandably worried about their children’s exposure to COVID-19. Do I send my child back to the classroom, home school them, or opt for online classes? Fears over the lack of social distancing, schools enforcing mask policies of older students, and not requiring mask wearing for younger children are just a few of the concerns. Many parents’ fears, when faced with the threat of exposure and further spread of COVID, are only made worse when the parents are no longer together and cannot agree on how to address the situation. If you find yourself dealing with whether your children should return to school, with or without a court-ordered custody order in place, an experienced family law attorney can assist you. Continue reading →

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In re NNB, COA 19-261 (Unpublished opinion)

The family courts in North Carolina operate under one abiding principle: the best interest of the child. This overarching concept takes precedence over every other consideration and can produce unexpected results. This article discusses a recent case in our county in which a father wanted custody of his minor child, but circumstances were not good for his case. Continue reading →

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A few years ago, when our state’s leading public university was hit with a public records request regarding a campus sexual assault, the school’s response led to a Constitutional standoff. The United States is a republic where the states have a great deal of autonomy, but what happens when a state institution seems to violate federal law? Continue reading →

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has stated that fear and anxiety related to the COVID-19 outbreak can be overwhelming and can cause increased emotional issues in both adults and children. People that may experience greater levels of stress include those who are at higher risk due to chronic diseases, children and teens that may not be able to understand the disease process, front line emergency and healthcare workers, and people that suffer from mental health or substance abuse issues. The added stress during the pandemic can include increased fear and worry about their own or a loved one’s health, changes in sleeping or eating habits, problems with concentration, loss of sleep, worsening chronic mental or physical health problems, or increased use of alcohol and/or drugs.

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