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HIRSCHLER V. HIRSCHLER, 2021-NCCOA-690 (2021).

Plaintiff and Defendant were awarded joint custody of their minor child. Plaintiff had primary physical custody, and Defendant was given extended summer visitation from June 1 to July 10 for each calendar year. Important to note, Plaintiff resided in North Carolina, while Defendant lived in Florida. Both parties agreed to deviate from the normal schedule so that Defendant would have the child from May 29 through July 8. Continue reading →

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In our last post, we wrote and talked about the basics of non-fungible tokens, or NFTs. They have some value on the market, and when things have value there will be a fight. When I first heard that a Nyan cat NFT sold for hundreds of thousands, and then when a simple picture of a Shiba Inu dog (the image at the heart of the the memecoin dogecoin and, predating that, just the general doge meme) also sold for a bunch of money, I began to wonder how copyright worked in this new NFT realm. Clearly, there was an artist that created the Nyan cat gif/meme/video, just like there would be a dog owner and photographer for the Shiba. Who should be getting paid from the sale of the associated NFTs? Continue reading →

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We’ve recently been writing about virtual currency, blockchains, and a regulatory sandbox for Fintechs. If you follow any of those topics with interest, you’ll very likely have heard of non-fungible tokens, or NFTs. NFTs are no longer questionable internet pictures but have moved into the mainstream. (Even Dolce & Gabbana has joined the NFT bandwagon.) Whether the trend has staying power is another question, but to early investors the NFT world is one filled with opportunity. Continue reading →

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December 30th is National Bacon Day. I assume it is a day to glorify and celebrate the many epicurean triumphs that bacon has brought to our society. Well, bah humbug. I for one, shall not be celebrating such a day. Continue reading →

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In the Northern Hemisphere the 2021 winter solstice will occur on December 21st. Winter solstice is when the North Pole is tilted farthest away from the sun.  At this time, the Arctic Circle is cloaked in darkness and the longest night of the year happens.  The winter solstice also signifies a turning point where the days begin gradually to get longer again.

Many cultures around the world have a long history of celebrating the winter solstice. Cultures attach great meaning to the solstices because the sun is a sacred star at the center of the solar system.  The sun not only serves as a function of time, but it also sets the weather and indicates agricultural patterns, which were extremely important for historical civilizations.

Solstice Celebrations Around the World

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Friday December 17th is going to be National Underdogs Day. What is an underdog and why is it so fun supporting them? An underdog is the predicted loser in a competition. It stems from Old English, referring to the “beaten dog in a fight.” Presumably, the “fight” is a dog fight—once a betting spectacle, but now illegal and inhumane. In modern usage, it just means the team or competitor who is not the betting favorite. Continue reading →

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Lacewell v. Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, No. 19-4271 (2d Cir. 2021)

  • Facts: The New York State Department of Financial Services (DFS) regulates insurance, banking, and financial services in the state of New York. They filed a lawsuit against the Office of the Comptroller of Currency (OCC), alleging that their new initiative to charter “special-purpose national banks” (SPNB) from financial technology companies (fintechs) exceeded their authority under National Bank Act (NBA) that requires those in the “business of banking” to take deposits.

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September is Hunger Action Month.  During September, members of the community can take a stand against hunger by sharing, volunteering, pledging, fundraising, or donating to help end hunger in America.  Although hunger is a nationwide problem, the Piedmont Triad struggles with food insecurity throughout the community.  In recent years, Greensboro-High Point ranked number 14 on The Food Research and Action Center’s national list for food hardship.  The coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated the problem. Continue reading →

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In July and August of 2020, the Cleveland Clinic’s MENtion It program surveyed 1,180 men, ages 18 and older, on how COVID has affected men’s mental and physical health. The study focuses on the effect of COVID on the current health of men and how men are coping with the changes. Continue reading →

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Spring in Greensboro brings certain things. Pollen, unexpected rain showers, warmer weather, and taxes. The American Rescue Plan was enacted as part of ongoing Covid-19 relief. This plan provides an additional relief check, subject to income-cap requirements based on either 2019 or 2020 tax returns (most recent filed). The Plan also provides for an advance on half of a potential child tax credit for next year. These payments may both be at issue in a divorce case. Having tax return money in contention between divorcing spouses is hardly a novel concept. But due to the legislation providing pandemic relief, many spouses must find creative ways to divide relief funds when they were based on joint filings. The child credit advance presents a new wrinkle in divorce and custody cases. Continue reading →