Articles Posted in Uncategorized

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September is Hunger Action Month.  During September, members of the community can take a stand against hunger by sharing, volunteering, pledging, fundraising, or donating to help end hunger in America.  Although hunger is a nationwide problem, the Piedmont Triad struggles with food insecurity throughout the community.  In recent years, Greensboro-High Point ranked number 14 on The Food Research and Action Center’s national list for food hardship.  The coronavirus pandemic has exacerbated the problem. Continue reading →

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Warren DSS v. Gerrelts, No.COA20-868 (June 2021).

This is an oddity of a case. Civil procedure has an interesting quirk called choice of law. It is an intensely fact-driven area of law that is still being actively researched and written about. Just the mere mention of the Erie Doctrine is probably enough to evoke trauma induced flashbacks to law school for many practicing attorneys. Put simply, since the state courts are courts of general jurisdiction, a state court sometimes has to apply another state’s law. Below is an interesting case about artificial insemination, paternity, and child support arising from a case where there are multiple states involved. Continue reading →

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Baldwin v. Baldwin, unpublished (2021).

After separation and divorce, it is not unheard of for one spouse to move out of state. If the former couple had minor children together, then the question is which spouse is primarily going to have custody of the children? Many factors may come into play when making the determination, such as improvement to quality of life. These are complicated cases, and the parent seeking custody needs to demonstrate that relocating the children to another state best serves the development and growth of the children. Continue reading →

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In July and August of 2020, the Cleveland Clinic’s MENtion It program surveyed 1,180 men, ages 18 and older, on how COVID has affected men’s mental and physical health. The study focuses on the effect of COVID on the current health of men and how men are coping with the changes. Continue reading →

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Spring in Greensboro brings certain things. Pollen, unexpected rain showers, warmer weather, and taxes. The American Rescue Plan was enacted as part of ongoing Covid-19 relief. This plan provides an additional relief check, subject to income-cap requirements based on either 2019 or 2020 tax returns (most recent filed). The Plan also provides for an advance on half of a potential child tax credit for next year. These payments may both be at issue in a divorce case. Having tax return money in contention between divorcing spouses is hardly a novel concept. But due to the legislation providing pandemic relief, many spouses must find creative ways to divide relief funds when they were based on joint filings. The child credit advance presents a new wrinkle in divorce and custody cases. Continue reading →

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You have probably heard the recent story of the theft of Lady Gaga’s French bulldogs and the shooting of her dog walker. If you have not, on February 24, 2021, around 9:40 p.m., Lady Gaga’s dog walker, Ryan Fischer, was accosted and shot, and two of her three French bulldogs were stolen. A local home security camera recorded the altercation. Lady Gaga offered a $500,000 no-questions-asked reward for the safe return of her dogs. Continue reading →

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By: John Davis, NCCP

It would be a challenge to identify a person in American history with more strength of character than Harriet Tubman. She was born into slavery, enduring its horrors and privations, and escaped to lead dozens of other enslaved persons to their freedom. She lived most of her life with a bounty on her head yet openly fought for justice against entrenched power. She was a fearless conductor on the Underground Railroad, saying she “never lost a passenger”; she assisted John Brown in his fight to end slavery; she fought with the Union Army in the Civil War and even led an armed assault in South Carolina that rescued hundreds of slaves. And she lived long enough to become a suffragist fighting for women’s right to vote. Continue reading →

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Susie Marshall Sharp was born in 1907 in Rocky Mount. Her family relocated to Reidsville, where her father became a lawyer. She attended Reidsville High School, followed by the North Carolina College for Women, now known as UNC-Greensboro, and ultimately entered law school in 1926 at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Before Justice Sharp’s enrollment, only three women had graduated UNC School of Law since 1911. Continue reading →

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Covid-19 and its accompanying social distancing have been hard on everyone’s dating life. Restaurants have decreased capacity, and some are not accepting in-house dining at all. Bars close early. And masks, while necessary for health, make it hard to read how your date is going. A lot of people are likely foregoing a dinner date in public in observance of social distancing rules. With Valentine’s Day rapidly approaching, the Parks and Recreation Department in Greensboro, North Carolina has decided to offer up a take-home kit for a truly wonderful Valentine’s date. Continue reading →

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On Saturday, January 30, 2021, the International Civil Rights Center and Museum (ICRCM) hosted its 61st Anniversary Gala virtually to celebrate national and local activists who have made significant contributions to advancing human and civil rights. Despite the pandemic, ICRCM flawlessly executed the event via Zoom, where all viewers and attendees had the best seat in the house—right from their living room couches.  Continue reading →