Distinctive Representation in Sophisticated Family Law Matters
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The language in any contract must be clear and unambiguous, and this standard is true of settlement agreements in divorce proceedings as well. When the terms of an agreement are left open to interpretation, it can lead to issues like contention and litigation. Continue reading →

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Timeframes and deadlines are a vital part of family law cases, both in trial court and appellate court. Whether filing an answer to a divorce complaint, responding to discovery requests, or objecting to a subpoena, deadlines are a regular part of civil court in North Carolina. In some situations, the consequences for missing a deadline only consist of additional paperwork or a request to the judge. However, there are times when failing to meet a deadline can prevent you from having your case heard, which is what happened in the North Carolina Court of Appeals case of Thiagarajan v. Jaganathan. Continue reading →

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In civil cases, such as child custody proceedings, either party can serve discovery requests on the other party. Discovery is the term used to describe the process of exchanging documents and information. It can include various methods, including interrogatories, requests for production of documents, requests for admission, and depositions.

Parties in child custody cases can use discovery to obtain information relevant to the case, but there are limitations.

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North Carolina residents who have lived in the state for at least six months can file for divorce. While separation and divorce are rarely easy, recent moves can make the process even more complicated. Continue reading →

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Custody decisions are largely based on the best interests of the children. This may sound like a simple decision-making process, but the variables involved are complex. Courts must consider the child’s physical and mental health, physical safety, and developmental needs. Moral standards are also relevant when deciding custody.

It is well-known that parental conflict can significantly impact a child’s mental health, as well as their physical safety in some scenarios, but how does such conflict impact changes to child custody in North Carolina? Continue reading →

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There have been many cases in North Carolina that establish the strength and importance of a parent’s constitutionally protected right to the care and control of their children. Another recent decision in the North Carolina Court of Appeals has further established this right for biological parents, showing that it is not easy for nonparents to be awarded custody.

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Parents have a constitutionally protected right to take care of their children, which includes making decisions about whom their children will spend time with. It is difficult to overcome this parental presumption. Grandparents who wish to seek visitation with their grandchildren should be aware that there are strict rules in North Carolina about when they can file and on what factors a decision will be based.

Evans v. Myers

In a recent North Carolina Court of Appeals case, Evans v. Myers, Mother appealed after the trial court granted Paternal Grandparents legal and physical custody of her child while only awarding her limited visitation.

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Grandparents can only file for visitation during an ongoing custody dispute between the parents or if they can prove the parents are unfit. What happens if the parents’ custody case is resolved before the court has a chance to decide on grandparent visitation? This was the question at the center of a recent North Carolina Court of Appeals case.

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