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Welwood v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2019113, 2019 WL 4187568 (2019)

(a) Facts: Husband and wife were married in 1973. They separated in Florida 2003 and signed an agreement dividing their property.

In the agreement, the husband conveyed to the wife a 50% interest in certain real estate partnerships. The partnerships were designed to generate tax savings in early years. A 1986 tax law change limiting the deduction of passive losses against other income made the partnerships much less attractive in their later years. Continue reading →

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HeydonGrauss v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2018209, 2018 WL 6720943 (2018)

(a) Facts: Husband and wife filed joint tax returns for tax years 2005 to 2009. They separated on 2010 and were divorced in 2015.

The parties did not enclose full payment with their 2005-2009 tax returns until 2010. The wife was not aware of this fact until 2010. But she was aware that the parties were spending beyond their incomes and living beyond their means. The wife paid nothing on the parties’ tax liabilities, and the divorce decree ordered her to reimburse the husband for half of the payments he had made. Continue reading →

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has stated that fear and anxiety related to the COVID-19 outbreak can be overwhelming and can cause increased emotional issues in both adults and children. People that may experience greater levels of stress include those who are at higher risk due to chronic diseases, children and teens that may not be able to understand the disease process, front line emergency and healthcare workers, and people that suffer from mental health or substance abuse issues. The added stress during the pandemic can include increased fear and worry about their own or a loved one’s health, changes in sleeping or eating habits, problems with concentration, loss of sleep, worsening chronic mental or physical health problems, or increased use of alcohol and/or drugs.

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By: S. Dean Michaux, JD

Are you concerned that your spouse or significant other may be having an affair? Have you thought about using spying software to track their online activity? Before you take that step there are Federal and North Carolina laws that could expose you to both civil and criminal charges. Continue reading →

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Neitzer v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2018156, 2018 WL 4519997 (2018)

(a) Facts: Husband owned and operated two businesses. The wife, who was trained as a nurse, was totally disabled after a series of spine and hip surgeries. Her income came primarily from disability benefits.

The couple separated in 2010. Their 2012 joint tax return was prepared by the husband’s business accountant. The wife was notified of the return only two hours before she was expected to sign it. The accountant had been told to disclose nothing to the wife about the husband’s personal or business finances. The wife signed the return without reading it. Continue reading →

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By: Y Michael Yin, JD

In our practice in Greensboro, North Carolina, it is not uncommon for the parties in a divorce to agree verbally to a change in child support payments. Read on to see how such an apparent show of comity may not hold up in the eyes of the court.

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Benson v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2018157, 2018 WL 4520083 (2018), aff’d, 774 F. App’x 339 (8th Cir. 2019)

(a) Facts: Wife owned a corporation that maintained and collected revenue from St. Louis parking meters. She fraudulently overbilled the city, was convicted, and went to prison. While she was in prison, the husband filed to divorce her.
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Asad v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 201780, 2017 WL 2211215 (2017), aff’d, 751 F. App’x 339 (3d Cir. 2018)

(a) Facts: A husband and wife owned rental properties. Each spouse was responsible for some of the properties. They filed joint tax returns in which they claimed losses on the properties. Continue reading →

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Rogers v. Comm’r, 908 F.3d 1094 (7th Cir. 2018)

(a) Facts: Husband and wife filed a joint tax return for 2004. The IRS assessed a deficiency, and the parties sought review in the Tax Court. The Tax Court held for the IRS.

Three years later, the wife filed a petition for innocent spouse relief. The IRS rejected that petition. The wife sought review in the Tax Court, which agreed with the IRS. The wife appealed to the Seventh Circuit. Continue reading →

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Shak v. Shak, ____ Mass. _____, SJC-12748 (2020).

Nondisparagement clauses are ubiquitous in custody agreements and orders. Generally, they are a blanket prohibition on a parent from “talking bad” about the other parent in a form that the minor child(ren) will understand (whether in their presence or on social media, etc.). These clauses are commonly included so that the child will grow up in a less tumultuous environment, free from psychological harm that stems from hurtful exchanges of words. In fact, our own courts have guidelines that are commonly incorporated into custody orders. However, the Massachusetts Supreme Court recently reviewed these clauses under a constitutional lens, and the result is quite interesting. Continue reading →