Articles Tagged with alimony

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Suozzo v. Suozzo, 2022-NCCOA-620.

Facts: Plaintiff wife and Defendant husband entered into a separation agreement wherein Defendant was to pay Plaintiff $200,000 in monthly installments over 240 months. This arrangement began in March 2006 and would terminate in March of 2026. For the first 18-36 months, Defendant made the monthly payment. Sometime in 2008, Defendant stopped making those payments. Plaintiff chose to file a breach of contract claim against Defendant but not until 2019, more than ten years since Defendant stopped paying. The trial court awarded Plaintiff $100,789 in damages, calculated by granting only the missed payments due within three years of the commencement of Plaintiff’s action—as any unpaid installments due prior to February 2016 were barred by the statute of limitations—and the payments that became due while the action was pending through judgment. Defendant appealed. Continue reading →

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Plaintiff Jolin Brady (“Mother”) and Defendant Erron Brady (“Father”) were married on April 26, 1997. Father and Mother had four children. Father was in undergraduate school at Brigham Young University when the parties married. While Father was in dental school, Mother worked as a paralegal and then stopped working when the parties’ eldest son was born. In 2002, Father and Mother moved to Charlotte, North Carolina once Father finished dental school. Father owns his own dental practice. In 2014, Mother began working as a part-time yoga instructor.

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Brady v. Brady, 2022 NCCOA 200 (N.C. Ct. App. 2022)

Brady v. Brady came before the NC Court of Appeals on Defendant Husband’s appeal.

ISSUE: What findings of facts are required to support awards of alimony, a distributive award, and the unequal distribution of assets. Continue reading →

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Aviles v. Vulovic, E076743 (filed June 9, 2022).

Facts: Plaintiff Husband married Defendant Wife in 2011. However, Wife’s previous divorce had not yet finalized. Wife’s first marriage ended in a separation, and in 2006 Wife filed a petition for divorce. Wife believed that a divorce would just materialize automatically six months after the filing of the petition. In 2007, Wife and Husband began dating. They married in Las Vegas in 2011. Wife later appeared for a child support hearing with her former husband, and the presiding judge informed her that she had not yet been divorced. Wife eventually finalized the divorce in 2012. Wife and Husband had two more wedding ceremonies in 2013, however they never received a marriage certificate from the court. Husband and Wife separated in 2020 and were in court for spousal support. Husband claimed that Wife was barred from seeking support because she was in a bigamous marriage. It was the trial court’s finding that Wife was a putative spouse and awarded her temporary spousal support. Husband appealed. Continue reading →

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Everyone has seen a hearing on TV, but very few people know the process that leads up to that hearing. 95% of family law cases get settled before they even go to trial. Family law cases can be very stressful, but knowing what’s coming next can help lessen that stress. For a few weeks, we will look at the steps of a family law case prior to a hearing.

Part 2:  The Complaint Continue reading →

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Davidson v. Davidson, 2022-NCCOA-267 (unpublished)

 

In North Carolina, alimony orders are modifiable upon showing the court that there has been a substantial change in circumstances for either party. In doing so, the trial court ought to revisit many of the factors that justified the original alimony order. The main requirement is that the modification order must relate to the financial needs of the dependent spouse and/or the ability to pay of the supporting spouse. Continue reading →

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Worst Roommate Ever is a true-crime documentary recently released on Netflix.  There are five episodes in Season 1 highlighting four different scenarios where cohabitation situations went south.  The second episode titled “Be Careful of the Quiet Ones” focuses on Maribel Ramos, a 36-year-old Iraq War veteran and Kwang Chol “KC” Joy.

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Wayne Hopper, Legal Assistant

Sorey v. Sorey, 757 S.E.2d 518 (2014)

Divorce is not something anyone expects when they get married. The end of a marriage can be more difficult when one spouse has engaged in behavior that violates the fundamental tenets of marriage. Such behavior is considered marital misconduct in the legal world, and it can take different forms, such as sexual affairs, reckless spending, abandonment, or excessive substance abuse. Misconduct can lead to separation or the end of a marriage. North Carolina law addresses marital misconduct as a cause of separation or divorce and how it may be considered in claims for post-separation or alimony. Continue reading →

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Wayne Hopper, Legal Assistant

Williams v. Williams, 261 S.E.2d 849 (1980)

Alimony (also called spousal support in North Carolina) is a form of financial support awarded during a divorce proceeding and serves as a means to assist a dependent spouse post marriage. A “dependent spouse” is a person substantially reliant on their spouse for financial support or maintenance. Under North Carolina law, either spouse can receive alimony so long as they meet one of two criteria: (1) the spouse cannot meet their own reasonable financial needs without the other spouse’s income or assets, or (2) the spouse cannot maintain the standard of living they have enjoyed during the marriage absent the other spouse’s income or assets. Continue reading →

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Sam Willis and Sarah Willis were married in August 1981.  Sam filed his Complaint on March 28, 1985, seeking a divorce from bed and board, alimony, and equitable distribution.  Before the parties married, Sam sold Sarah a house and lot on Claremont Road.  Throughout the marriage, the couple lived at the Claremont Road property.  Sam made all of the mortgage payments during the marriage.  These payments amounted to $9,900.  Sarah appeals from the equitable distribution judgment entered pursuant to N.C. Gen. Stat. § 50-20. Continue reading →