Articles Tagged with family lawyer

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Stewart v. Shipley, 825 S.E.2d 684, 264 N.C.App. 241 (N.C. App. 2019)

You might imagine your civil court case as a game. All games have rules, and the handbook that tells you how to play the game is the Rules of Civil Procedure. And you can’t break the rules without consequences. The rules exist in a game to make things fair and efficient and ordinary. In this way, the Rules of Civil Procedure promotes fairness, efficiency, and order. Below is a case that talks about one of those rules. Continue reading →

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Matthew Taylor Coleman and his wife, Abby Coleman, were living a picturesque life in their Santa Barbara, California home with their two young children—Kaleo, a two-year-old boy, and Roxy, a ten-month-old girl— when events took a turn for the worse.  While the family was packing for a camping trip, Matthew allegedly placed the children in the family van and drove away without a word to Abby.  She was unable to reach him by phone but eventually tracked his location with the help of authorities and the Find My iPhone application.  After being stopped by law enforcement at the U.S.-Mexico border and taken into custody, Matthew told investigators he killed his children with a spearfishing gun after being “enlightened by QAnon and Illuminati conspiracy theories.”  Believing that Abby possessed serpent DNA that had been passed down to his children, Matthew claimed the death of his children was “saving the world from monsters.”  Matthew has been charged with the foreign murder of U.S. nationals.  Continue reading →

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WALTER V. WALTER 2021-NCCOA-428

The language contained in a consent order should be unambiguous and clearly state what each party is required to do under the order. When the reading of the order leads to multiple reasonable interpretations, it may become impossible to enforce through contempt. Below is a custody consent order that had one such line of ambiguous language: Continue reading →

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Orren v. Orren, 800 S.E.2d 472, 253 N.C.App. 480 (N.C. App. 2017)

We have previously written about what cohabitation means in the alimony and postseparation support context. Essentially, according to North Carolina law, it is an appropriate termination point for alimony and postseparation support. But in some cases, a party that could potentially bring a claim for spousal support may have already begun to cohabitate. Can the potential supporting party claim cohabitation as a defense? Continue reading →

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Wall v. Wall, 536 S.E.2d 647, 140 N.C. App. 303 (N.C. App. 2000)

There are various legal mechanisms by which former spouses separate their personal and real property. One mechanism is Equitable Distribution (ED). Practically speaking, however, no division of property should be accomplished without first obtaining an Order/Judgment from the court. This is especially true for more valuable and unique assets like real property. So what happens if you have your hearing, but don’t get an Order in a timely manner? Continue reading →

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Divorces among the stars continue to spark gossip throughout Hollywood, but recent developments in Kelly Clarkson’s divorce from Brandon Blackstock are turning heads.  The couple divorce papers were filed in June of 2020, after seven years of marriage.  Blackstock served as Clarkson’s talent manager during the marriage.  Recent reports note that he is opting for a post-divorce life out of the limelight by becoming a full-time rancher on the former couple’s ranch in Montana. Continue reading →

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It is no secret that millennials often get a bad rap.  As one of the largest generations in history, their influence in the world is far-reaching. Growing up in rapidly changing times has meant that millennials have redefined many aspects of life, with priorities and expectations drastically different from previous generations.  As a result, millennials have successfully put their spin on prenuptial agreements and are looking at this important pre-marital contract through a different lens. Continue reading →

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Texts and emails relevant to your case can and should be exhibits. Often times, they prove or disprove that certain conversations were had. In the family law context, they often show certain things like discussion of finances, custody, verbal abuse, or even the overall character of a spouse. But there are barriers to cross before the texts can be admitted as evidence. Continue reading →

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In North Carolina, a stipulation, in the legal context, is an agreement between the parties in a lawsuit. It is most commonly used by parties to extend deadlines for responding to discovery or to agree on a factual finding that is uncontested. It can be done to minimize costs in litigation, because there is no need to spend time proving something that is agreed upon. Good practice dictates that stipulations are written and signed by the parties and/or attorneys and then presented to the court. Continue reading →

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2020 Formal Ethics Opinion 5

In recent years, there has been a marked increase in the number of attempts to defraud attorneys of their clients’ funds in trust accounts. Now con artists are stealing from clients directly by using “inside information.” These scams are constantly evolving and are becoming much more sophisticated, as many processes that attorneys use are now digital. This includes sensitive data about an attorney and their office that may be used as part of a scam. Continue reading →