Articles Tagged with family law

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Salvadore v. Salvadore, 2021-NCCOA-680 (2021 unpublished)

  • Facts: Wife and Husband married in 1989. During their marriage, Husband would frequently change his job. Husband had a peculiar habit every time he changed jobs that required relocation to another state. He would stay in hotels and campgrounds in the new state while Wife would stay at the marital residence at the old state. Husband would also regularly return to the marital residence on weekends. This would continue until the couple bought a new home in the new state. When Husband accepted a new job in New York, he continued this habit. However, before he left, he asked for a separation on April 17, 2017. But true to habit, he stayed in hotels in campgrounds in New York, while returning to the marital residence in North Carolina on weekends. This happened until July 16, 2017—the last night he spent in the marital residence with Wife. As part of his appeal of an equitable distribution order, he argued that the date of separation should have been April 2017, not the July 2017 date.

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Dillree v. Dillree

Navigating the intricacies of divorce and legal separation is often a complex and emotionally challenging process. The recent court case of Dillree v. Dillree, adjudicated by the North Carolina Court of Appeals, provides critical insights into the nuanced nature of such proceedings, especially for middle-aged to older adults. This case is particularly relevant for Greensboro divorce lawyers, who often encounter scenarios where the separation process intersects with issues of competency and guardianship. Continue reading →

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Divorce is a complex process that involves not just the emotional separation of two people but also the intricate untangling of their financial lives. A recent case, heard by the United States Court of Appeals, First Circuit, highlights this complexity, particularly when it intersects with issues of alleged financial wrongdoing. If you or someone you know is contemplating a divorce in the future, it’s essential to stay informed about such cases, as they can offer valuable insights for anyone navigating a divorce in Greensboro, or elsewhere. Continue reading →

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In the world of high-profile divorces, the recent separation of Wolfgang Porsche from his wife Claudia, due to her dementia-like illness, offers a poignant example of the unique challenges faced in such cases. As Greensboro divorce lawyers, we often encounter complex and emotionally charged situations, but divorces involving degenerative cognitive diseases like dementia present particularly sensitive challenges. Continue reading →

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Jackson v. Jackson, 2021-NCCOA-614 (2021)

  1. Facts: Mother and Father had an unincorporated child support agreement for their three children. Custody was shared between the parties. Later, one child aged out. Mother then relocated, and one child moved with her. The other remaining minor child moved in with Father. For this period, Father sought temporary child support and termination of his previous child support obligation because of the change in custody situation. Mother then filed a breach of contract for Father’s lowering and subsequent cessation of child support payments. At trial the court considered Father’s bonuses and commissions as part of his income. His base salary was $58,000, but he testified that he expected to get commissions even though he had not yet received any. The court found that father’s income was $71,000 annually.

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Child support calculations use multiple factors to determine an appropriate amount of support. Perhaps the most significant of these factors is the income of both parents. When parents have salaried jobs or work for an hourly wage, these calculations are fairly straightforward. But for parents who own businesses or have self-employment income, determining child support can become complicated. Continue reading →

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The Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act (UCCJEA) is used to determine which state should have jurisdiction in interstate custody cases. It is a uniform law, which means it was written with the intention and hope that each state would adopt it and create uniformity across the country. Continue reading →

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In the realm of celebrity divorces, Halle Berry’s recent settlement with ex-husband Olivier Martinez offers some interesting insights, especially for high-income mothers in Greensboro facing similar circumstances. As Greensboro divorce attorneys, we observe such high-profile cases not just for their star power, but for the legal precedents and insights they offer.

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Child custody orders in North Carolina are binding, and both parents must abide by the terms to avoid facing legal consequences. Despite this, it is possible to modify an order if there has been a change in the circumstances of either party and if the modification is in the best interest of the child. How does a judge weigh these two considerations, and does one factor need to be proven before the other? Continue reading →

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Deciding to relocate with children is not always easy, as numerous factors must be considered. Divorced, separated, or unmarried parents with custody orders have additional considerations they must think about both before and after they move. Continue reading →