COVID-19 UPDATE: Woodruff Family Law Group Remains Open and Operational - More Information Click Here.

Articles Tagged with nc divorce attorney

Published on:

Stowe v. Stowe, ___ N.C. App. ___ (2020).

In North Carolina, Equitable Distribution (ED) is one of the mechanisms by which former spouses separate their personal and real property. What if the during the marriage one party opens a business? Unlike other forms of property, businesses have reputations that are carefully cultivated, as well as patrons and other intangibles that make the business more valuable than what can be accounted for on paper. Courts call this factor Goodwill. In the case below, we explore how one court handled Goodwill for an insurance company. Continue reading →

Published on:

We all know Cam Newton, the football quarterback who used to play for the Carolina Panthers but recently signed on with the New England Patriots.  Back in 2011, the football legend was drafted as the first overall pick by the Carolina Panthers.  He played countless games right here in our home state at Bank of America Stadium. He broke countless NFL records for passing and rushing yards by a rookie quarterback in his rookie year.  More recently, Newton has made the news for a reason other than football.  Newton is currently involved in a child support battle with his ex, Kia Proctor. Continue reading →

Published on:

You’ve decided to seek a divorce and perhaps to seek child support for your children, or you’re looking at equitable distribution of your marital assets. You’ve researched, met with, and retained your attorney. Now the attorney or a member of the attorney’s staff is calling or sending emails asking questions and seeking what seems like an endless list of documents. You hired this attorney to represent you; why are they putting so much work on you and asking for all this information? Continue reading →

Published on:

Searcy v. Searcy, No. COA11-11 (N.C. Ct. App. 2011)

In North Carolina, settlement and distribution of marital property can be addressed in a separation agreement. Such an agreement is essentially a contract between the parties. A unique term, “fiduciary,” is sometimes used to describe a relationship between spouses that can be distilled to mean trust. As in contract law, there must be full and truthful disclosure of facts surrounding terms and provisions in a contract between parties who are fiduciaries to each other. Failing to disclose a certain fact can render the contract invalid. But in divorce proceedings, when does the fiduciary relationship end? In the case below, we see that there is no bright line. Continue reading →