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Articles Posted in CPAVille

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Culwick v. Wood, 384 F. Supp. 3d 328 (E.D.N.Y. 2019)

(a) Facts: Husband and wife were divorced. Their divorce decree incorporated a separation agreement. The agreement provided:

[T]he Husband shall otherwise retain all pensions and annuities acquired by him at any time, including during the term of the marriage. . . . The Wife waives any claims she might have in and to these benefits including the right to be named as a survivor beneficiary.

384 F. Supp. 3d at 335. The agreement further provided that “nothing herein contained shall require either party to renounce or disclaim any gift, devise or bequest which he or she may be given by the other’s Will, Trust, or other document.” Id.

The husband died. At the time of his death, the wife was still named as the survivor beneficiary of his retirement plan under a predivorce designation. The husband’s estate assigned its claim to the husband’s father. The plan paid the survivor benefits to the wife, and the father sued the wife to recover the amount paid.

(b) Issue: Who is entitled to the husband’s survivor benefits?

(c) Answer to Issue: His father. Continue reading →

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Miletello v. RMR Mech., Inc., 921 F.3d 493 (5th Cir. 2019)

(a) Facts: Husband and wife were engaged in divorce proceedings. A settlement agreement awarded to the wife $500,000 of the funds in the husband’s 401(k) plan.

Before the husband complied with the order, he died. Two days later, the state court incorporated the settlement into a court order. Fifteen months later, the state court entered a QDRO ordering the plan to pay the ex-wife the $500,000.

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Christopoulos v. Trout, 343 F. Supp. 3d 812 (N.D. Ill. 2018)

(a) Facts: Husband filed a divorce action against wife in Illinois. Immediately thereafter, he changed the beneficiary of his employer-provided group life insurance, naming a series of relatives in varying percentages.

The wife immediately asked the divorce judge to order the husband to name the children as beneficiaries. The trial court properly entered a handwritten order granting the relief requested.

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Garcia Tatupu v. Bert Bell/Peter Rozelle NFL Player Ret. Plan, 296 F. Supp. 3d 407 (D. Mass. 2017), aff’d, 747 F. App’x 873 (1st Cir. 2019)

(a) Facts: The husband, a former NFL football player, was divorced from his wife in Massachusetts in 1997. The decree incorporated a separation agreement, which provided: Continue reading →

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Heedram v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2018‑25, 2018 WL 1193421 (2018)

 

(a) Facts: A husband and wife married in 2011 and divorced in 2015.  During the marriage, the wife earned most of the parties’ income and handled the parties’ finances.  She had unpaid federal taxes from before the marriage.  The parties had difficulty meeting the mortgage payments on their home, and the husband knew this.

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            Minton v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2018‑15, 2018 WL 718520 (2018)

 

(a) Facts: A woman married a man who ran a struggling air conditioner business.  The wife was aware that the business was struggling, as the parties had difficulty paying their bills, but the husband convinced her that a big contract was coming and success was just around the corner.  He even convinced her to make a tax-penalized early withdrawal from her 401(k) plan and invest the funds in his business.  The wife was abused verbally during the marriage, but not physically.

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Cojocar v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2017‑189, 2017 WL 4321149 (2017)

 

(a) Facts: A husband and wife filed joint tax returns from 2009 to 2012.  The 2011 return reported $170,870 in income for the husband, $30,870 in income for the wife, and $289 in interest income.  The parties did not pay the tax reported on the return.

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Gebman v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2017‑184, 2017 WL 4158699 (2017)

 

(a) Facts: A husband and wife signed a joint tax return.  The IRS assessed a deficiency.  Both parties sought relief in the Tax Court.

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            Jacobsen v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2018‑115, 2018 WL 3598803 (2018)

 

(a) Facts: The husband worked 12-hour shifts 14 days per month as a machine operator at a factory.  He also operated a home inspection business.  The wife was employed as an accountant and also managed the finances of both the home inspection business and the family.  The husband never reviewed bank or credit statements or otherwise examined the parties’ finances.  “Petitioner relied on Ms. Lemmens to handle the family finances because of her training as an accountant.”  2018 WL 3598803, at *1.

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