Articles Posted in Alimony Tax

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Leslie v. Comm’r, 725 F. App’x 597 (9th Cir. 2018) (unpublished)

(a) Facts: A husband and wife signed a separation agreement to settle a California divorce case.  In a section entitled “Spousal Support,” the agreement awarded the wife $7,000 per month, stating expressly that it would end upon either party’s death.

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Hexum v. Comm’r, 721 F. App’x 512 (7th Cir. 2018) (unpublished)

(a) Facts: The parties were divorced in Illinois.  The wife remained in the former marital home, and the husband was ordered to pay the mortgage.  Upon an eventual sale of the home, the parties were to split the net proceeds. Continue reading →

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by Carolyn Woodruff, attorney, CPA

As has been widely reported, Congress has repealed I.R.C. §§ 71 and 215, thereby eliminating the federal tax reduction for alimony.  In addition, Congress has repealed former I.R.C. § 61(a)(8), which expressly defined alimony as taxable income. Continue reading →

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Carolyn Woodruff, J.D., C.P.A, C.V.A.

Forget it!

Forget about the alimony deduction for all new decrees or instruments post-2019. (See Part I for modification of pre-2019 alimony orders and agreement, as modification has a separate set of rules.) The deduction is gone absent a congressional miracle. That means on December 31, 2018, or before you must have alimony that qualifies under IRC Section 71 before it is repealed. The alimony must meet the terms of Section 71, pre-TCJA and pre-2019, which are as follows: Continue reading →

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Carolyn Woodruff, J.D., C.P.A, C.V.A.

Previously, we examined the paragraph and subparagraphs defining “divorce or separation instruments.” Now let’s take a look at which sections of TCJA incorporate these subparagraphs.

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Carolyn Woodruff, J.D., C.P.A, C.V.A.

The repeal of the alimony tax sections for the inclusion of income and deduction has an ancillary impact on other divorce tax issues. The effective date for all ancillary issues discussed in this article is December 31, 2018, the same as the alimony repeal. These December 31, 2018, changes shall be referred to herein as “post-2018” changes. Continue reading →

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Carolyn Woodruff, J.D., C.P.A, C.V.A.

Divorce was hard enough, and now alimony tax reform. Do you feel good or bad about alimony? No matter your answer, this alimony tax reform revolutionizes the divorce arena, and you need to know how it may affect you and your clients. Judges need to know how it might affect those whose appear before them as litigants. So let’s dig in. Continue reading →

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Anderson v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2016-47, 2016 WL 976816 (2016)

Facts: An Alabama court entered a pretrial order in a divorce case, requiring both parties to “[m]aintain status quo as to payment of house note or rent, utilities, food, necessities, fixed credit obligations, ” 2016 WL 976816, at *1. After the order was entered, the husband transferred at least $1,000 each month to the wife “for her spending money and other things that I had previously paid for.” Id. Continue reading →

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Wolens v. United States, 125 Fed. Cl. 422 (2016)

Facts: The parties married in New York, but divorced in England. Their English divorce decree provided for a large initial payment to be made by the husband to the wife, followed by annual payments of £441,667 in 2007, 2008, and 2009. (The 2009 payment was one pound less.)The husband’s initial tax return did not claim the 2007 payment as alimony. He later filed an amended return which did claim the 2007 payment as alimony. The IRS disallowed this return and refused to issue a refund. Continue reading →

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By: Dana M. Horlick, Attorney, Woodruff Family Law Group

Muniz v. Comm’r, T.C. Memo. 2015-125, 2015 WL 4126356 (2015)

(a) Facts: A Florida separation agreement provided that the husband would pay wife $1,000 per month in alimony. The husband did not pay on time, and the court entered an enforcement order directing the husband to pay $6,000 in alimony due under the agreement. The husband paid this amount. Continue reading →